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MULTIMODAL TRANSPORTATION

The Okeechobee Blvd & SR 7 Multimodal Corridor Study includes a transit and roadway analysis for the following seven alternatives/concepts:

Existing Conditions

Figure 1. Okeechobee Blvd. from SR 7 to Florida's Turnpike
Goal: Allocate roadway space appropriately for non-motorized users, transit and single occupancy vehicles

Provide safe facilities for the most vulnerable users 

Maximize corridor throughout with emphasis on shared

     mobility

Minimize travel time and delay for all users

Increase access to education, healthcare and economic 

     opportunity

Goal: Maximize return on any investment in enhanced transit service area

Locate transit stops at major activity centers

Provide enhanced amenities at enhanced transit areas

Provide walkable and bikeable environments for first and

    last mile connection

Provide capital investments that promote

    redevelopment/infill development supportive of transit

Achieve operating cost efficiency

The existing local bus service operates within traffic and stops more frequently, impacting travel times for both the bus service and other cars. Existing bike lanes on the corridor do not have a painted nor physical buffer separating them from vehicle travel lanes. Sidewalks are 6 feet wide and continuous throughout most of the corridor.

 

Mixed Traffic Bus with Limited Stops

Figure 3. Okeechobee Blvd. from SR 7 to Florida's Turnpike
Figure 4. Okeechobee Blvd. from Florida's Turnpike to I-95
Goal: Allocate roadway space appropriately for non-motorized users, transit and single occupancy vehicles

Provide safe facilities for the most vulnerable users 

Maximize corridor throughout with emphasis on shared

     mobility

Minimize travel time and delay for all users

Increase access to education, healthcare and economic 

     opportunity

Goal: Maximize return on any investment in enhanced transit service area

Locate transit stops at major activity centers

Provide enhanced amenities at enhanced transit areas

Provide walkable and bikeable environments for first and

    last mile connection

Provide capital investments that promote

    redevelopment/infill development supportive of transit

Achieve operating cost efficiency

Like existing conditions, buses operate in mixed traffic, but with fewer stops. This option improves travel time for transit minimally and does not significantly improve congestion on the corridor. This alternative also includes improving bicycle lanes by adding a painted buffer and adding 12-foot-wide sidewalks.

 

Business Access & Transit (BAT) Lanes

Figure 5. Okeechobee Blvd. from SR 7 to Florida's Turnpike
Figure 6. Okeechobee Blvd. from Florida's Turnpike to I-95
Goal: Allocate roadway space appropriately for non-motorized users, transit and single occupancy vehicles

Provide safe facilities for the most vulnerable users 

Maximize corridor throughout with emphasis on shared

     mobility

Minimize travel time and delay for all users

Increase access to education, healthcare and economic 

     opportunity

Goal: Maximize return on any investment in enhanced transit service area

Locate transit stops at major activity centers

Provide enhanced amenities at enhanced transit areas

Provide walkable and bikeable environments for first and

    last mile connection

Provide capital investments that promote

    redevelopment/infill development supportive of transit

Achieve operating cost efficiency

BAT lanes provide a partially dedicated lane for bus service while still accommodating right-turning vehicles. This alternative helps reduce congestion and will improve efficiency for the transit service but, sharing the lane with right-turning vehicles can cause a slower travel time for transit. This alternative also includes improving bicycle lanes by adding a painted buffer and adding 12-foot-wide sidewalks.

 

Curbside Dedicated-Lane Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)

Figure 7. Okeechobee Blvd. from SR 7 to Florida's Turnpike
Figure 8. Okeechobee Blvd. from Florida's Turnpike to I-95
Goal: Allocate roadway space appropriately for non-motorized users, transit and single occupancy vehicles

Provide safe facilities for the most vulnerable users 

Maximize corridor throughout with emphasis on shared

     mobility

Minimize travel time and delay for all users

Increase access to education, healthcare and economic 

     opportunity

Goal: Maximize return on any investment in enhanced transit service area

Locate transit stops at major activity centers

Provide enhanced amenities at enhanced transit areas

Provide walkable and bikeable environments for first and

    last mile connection

Provide capital investments that promote

 redevelopment/infill development supportive of transit

Achieve operating cost efficiency

Curbside Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is a more premium form of bus service with less stops and a dedicated transit lane. It removes almost all conflicts between buses and cars that cause traffic congestion except for some right-turning vehicles. This alternative also improves the bicycle lanes by adding a physical buffer and adding 12-foot-wide sidewalks.

 

Center Platform Dedicated-Lane Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)

Figure 9. Okeechobee Blvd. from SR 7 to Florida's Turnpike
Figure 10. Okeechobee Blvd. from Florida's Turnpike to I-95
Goal: Allocate roadway space appropriately for non-motorized users, transit and single occupancy vehicles

Provide safe facilities for the most vulnerable users 

Maximize corridor throughout with emphasis on shared

     mobility

Minimize travel time and delay for all users

Increase access to education, healthcare and economic 

     opportunity

Goal: Maximize return on any investment in enhanced transit service area

Locate transit stops at major activity centers

Provide enhanced amenities at enhanced transit areas

Provide walkable and bikeable environments for first and

    last mile connection

Provide capital investments that promote

 redevelopment/infill development supportive of transit

Achieve operating cost efficiency

Center Platform Dedicated-Lane BRT is a more efficient BRT service than Curbside BRT service. It operates in the center of the roadway avoiding most conflicts with other vehicles. Center Platform BRT operates more like light rail transit but with significantly less cost to build and less time to implement. This alternative also improves the bicycle lanes by adding a physical buffer and adding 12-foot-wide sidewalks. Travel times and delays can be improved, but not dramatically.

 

Center Platform Dedicated-Lane Light Rail

Figure 11. Okeechobee Blvd. from SR 7 to Florida's Turnpike
Figure 12. Okeechobee Blvd. from Florida's Turnpike to I-95
Goal: Allocate roadway space appropriately for non-motorized users, transit and single occupancy vehicles

Provide safe facilities for the most vulnerable users 

Maximize corridor throughout with emphasis on shared

     mobility

Minimize travel time and delay for all users

Increase access to education, healthcare and economic 

     opportunity

Goal: Maximize return on any investment in enhanced transit service area

Locate transit stops at major activity centers

Provide enhanced amenities at enhanced transit areas

Provide walkable and bikeable environments for first and

    last mile connection

Provide capital investments that promote

 redevelopment/infill development supportive of transit

Achieve operating cost efficiency

Light rail (LRT) is a very efficient transit service, with slightly faster travel time and higher capacity than center running BRT service. However, light rail costs a lot more to build and maintain, requires more density, and takes significantly more time to implement than BRT service. The Center-Platform Dedicated-Lane alternative also improves the bicycle lanes by adding a physical buffer and adding 12-foot-wide sidewalks.

 

Elevated Grade-Separated Light Rail

Figure 13. Okeechobee Blvd. from SR 7 to Florida's Turnpike
Figure 14. Okeechobee Blvd. from Florida's Turnpike to I-95
Goal: Allocate roadway space appropriately for non-motorized users, transit and single occupancy vehicles

Provide safe facilities for the most vulnerable users 

Maximize corridor throughout with emphasis on shared

     mobility

Minimize travel time and delay for all users

Increase access to education, healthcare and economic 

     opportunity

Goal: Maximize return on any investment in enhanced transit service area

Locate transit stops at major activity centers

Provide enhanced amenities at enhanced transit areas

Provide walkable and bikeable environments for first and

    last mile connection

Provide capital investments that promote

 redevelopment/infill development supportive of transit

Achieve operating cost efficiency

The Elevated Grade-Separated Light Rail (LRT) alternative operates exclusively on its own above-grade railway. It provides the fastest transit service of the seven alternatives and eliminates conflicts with other traffic. However, this alternative costs significantly more to build and maintain than at-grade LRT, requires more dense development and needs a lot more time to implement. This alternative also improves the bicycle lanes by adding a physical buffer and adding 12-foot-wide sidewalks.